Archive for November, 2011

Richard Phillips “traffics in glossy erotica and celebrity images”

Wednesday, November 30th, 2011

Richard Phillips, who grew up in Marblehead, Massachusetts and studied fine art at Boston University before moving to NYC, “traffics in glossy erotica and celebrity images,” according to the NY Times.

Giant chair vandalized in Kittery

Wednesday, November 30th, 2011

“Vandalism makes you feel icky anyway,” says artist Pamela Dulong Williams after a landmark 12-foot-tall wooden chair on the front lawn of the Wentworth Dennett Studios in Kittery, Maine, was damaged last weekend.

Will Barnet attends his centenary retrospective

Wednesday, November 30th, 2011

Franklin Einspruch on Massachusetts native Will Barnet: “The artist accomplished a triumph that defies all criticism: the museums mounted a centenary retrospective of his work, and he attended it.”

Exhibit of late painter Marilyn Carr

Thursday, November 17th, 2011

“She was all kinds of lovely things. She was serene. Almost nothing ever flapped her. She was totally content in her own self,” says Ben Carr of his wife Marilyn Carr, who died in 2009 of ovarian cancer. An exhibit of her art is now at the University of Maine at Machias. “And as long as she could lift a brush, she painted.”

Museum celebrates Dallin’s 150th birthday

Thursday, November 17th, 2011

Cyrus Dallin Art Museum in Arlington, Massachusetts, celebrates what would have been the 150th birthday of sculptor Cyrus Edwin Dallin—creator of “Paul Revere” sculpture in the North End, the “Appeal to the Great Spirit” at the MFA’s Huntington Avenue entrance and “Anne Hutchinson” on the State House grounds—with a free open house on Nov. 20.

Artists hang linocuts on NH bulletin boards

Thursday, November 17th, 2011

Six artists hang their linocuts on community bulletin boards across New Hampshire. “It’s about art in unexpected places, and art in everyday life,” explained Adam Blue.

Students complete mural at MassBay

Thursday, November 17th, 2011

Students Pablo Marchena of Waltham, Jonathan Cardoso of Boston and Jason Bernardini of Franklin complete mural at MassBay Community College in Wellesley.

Photo of NH river one of the most expensive in the world

Wednesday, November 16th, 2011

Photos are being auctioned for record-breaking prices: “Peter Lik holds the record for the most expensive photograph by an Australian, when his image of the Androscoggin River in New Hampshire in the United States, One, sold for $1 million in January.”

Keene State College awarded $20K to preserve art

Tuesday, November 15th, 2011

Keene State College awarded nearly $20,000 from the New Hampshire State Conservation License Plate Trust Fund to help preserve the New Hampshire school’s art collection.

Robert Indiana on moving to Maine

Tuesday, November 15th, 2011

“I was given a ride in a boat to the harbor,” Robert Indiana says of first making his home at Vinalhaven, Maine. “I walked up the ramp, and the first building I saw was this old derelict Odd Fellow’s lodge, which I later found out was called the ‘Star of Hope,’ and within ten days my host had purchased it for me.”

Expensive painting was decorating beach house

Tuesday, November 15th, 2011

William Powell Frith’s 19th century painting “Derby Day,” which “hung in a family’s unlocked New England beach house for half a century” could fetch $800,000 when it’s auctioned next month, according to Christie’s auction house. “It had been hanging in a modest New England beach house for decades before a friend of the owner suggested it might be worth something. Christie’s won’t be more specific about the location because the owner wants to remain anonymous. [Peter Brown of Christie's] said the vendor, who is in his 60s, believes his parents bought the painting some time before World War II, when Victorian art was often dismissed as garish and sentimental.”

Ploughshares turns 40

Sunday, November 13th, 2011

Boston’s Ploughshares literary magazine celebrates its 40th anniversary.

Duane Slick featured in Indianapolis

Sunday, November 13th, 2011

Painter Duane Slick of Rhode Island is among the Native American artists featured in the Eiteljorg Museum of American Indians and Western Art’s Contemporary Art Fellowship exhibit in Indianapolis.

Lost for 80 years, Welsh painting found in Massachusetts

Sunday, November 13th, 2011

The 18th century self-portrait by Edward Owen of Wales had last been seen publicly in 1927. “Nobody had the faintest idea what happened to the self-portrait after that date,” art historian Peter Lord explains, “until it turned up in Massachusetts.”

Bank of America rakes in fees from unemployment benefits

Friday, November 11th, 2011

Bank of America, a major patron of Boston’s MFA and ICA, “rakes in big debit-card fees from people withdrawing unemployment benefits.” Will it ever become too embarrassing for art institutions to be connected with such donors?

The problems of slow artists

Friday, November 11th, 2011

The problems of slow artists: Boston artist Candace Jans augments her, maybe, two paintings a year by also selling her studies.

87-year-old’s WWII uniform in MFA show

Friday, November 11th, 2011

“I happened to mention that I had a World War II uniform hanging up and doing nothing, so I donated it,” says 87-year-old veteran Arthur Fishtine of his uniform now on view in the Boston MFA’s “Beauty as Duty” exhibit. “I never looked so good in it, but it looks good on the mannequin.”

Adrian Molina’s 210-foot scroll

Friday, November 11th, 2011

“If this is a narrative of time,” says Adrian Molina of his 210-foot scroll on exhibit at a Boston gallery, “you’re also experiencing time.”

“Romney would cut federal cultural agencies by half”

Friday, November 11th, 2011

Presidential candidate “Mitt Romney would cut federal cultural agencies by half.”

Feds approve Christo’s plan to suspend fabric over parts of a 42-mile stretch of Colorado river

Tuesday, November 8th, 2011

Feds approve Christo’s plan to suspend fabric over parts of a 42-mile stretch of Colorado river. It must still receive approval from various Colorado agencies. After the artist’s wife Jeanne-Claude died in 2009, we wondered if this would be the end of his projects, as she struck us as the municipal mover-and-shaker of the duo. Glad to see this long-planned project is continuing forward.

Tea Party museum snubs local artists?

Tuesday, November 8th, 2011

“If they wanted to make inroads with the community, it would have been better to do an open call to artists,” Kathleen Bitetti, co-founder of the Massachusetts Artists Leaders Coalition, said of the Boston Tea Party Museum’s decision to commission an out-of-state artist to create bronze sculptures of a Minuteman and Sam Adams without apparently giving area sculptors a chance to craft the life-sized works of art. “We have some really great sculptors here and as a national organization Historic Tours should know better.”

Jan Brett’s new kids book about a run-away troll

Sunday, November 6th, 2011

“I always wanted to do a book about running away, because I always had this romantic vision of running away and living with animals,” Massachusetts kids book author and illustrator Jan Brett says of her new book “Home for Christmas,” about a run-away troll. “We had a big barn in the back of our house growing up and I always wanted to live in the horse’s stall.”

Arthur Ganson’s mechanical mantras

Sunday, November 6th, 2011

“When you’re designing a machine, you’re usually designing it to be useful,” says kinetic sculptor Arthur Ganson of Boston. “With my machines, the function I’m designing it for is an aesthetic function. … More and more with the new pieces, I see them as acting as a kind of mechanical mantra for meditation. That’s my goal: that the piece help bring somebody to a meditative place.”

Boston is 4th best American city for culture?

Thursday, November 3rd, 2011

Boston is “America’s” fourth “favorite city” for culture, according to readers of “Travel + Leisure.” Providence comes in at nine and Portland, Maine, at 12.

In praise of “crap” technology

Thursday, November 3rd, 2011

In praise of “crap” technology: “It’s worth next to nothing so I’m virtually assured never to lose it—unlike apparently every iPhone prototype ever—and I don’t cringe at all when my toddler flings it across the room. And because the next Coby is sure to be just as mediocre, I’ll never need to upgrade—I’ve stepped off the escalators of feature creep and planned obsolescence, and all the expense and toxic e-waste that come with them. Crap technology, it turns out, is green technology.”